Panorama Test (NIPT)

 

At Jordemoderhuset we offer the non-invasive Panorama Test screening for Down’s syndrome, Trisomy 18 & 13, Turner syndrome as well as a number of other chromosomal abnormalities.

The test involves a scan, purely to determine the due date, and a blood test.

 

 

It is possible to use the test from as early as 9+0 weeks gestation and throughout the rest of the pregnancy. It can also be used on IVF pregnancies, twin pregnancies and surrogate-/ egg donor- pregnancies

 

The Panorama test is an American product and the blood test is analysed at an American laboratory

 

We always do a scan on the same day as we take the blood test. The answer will be sent to you via e-mail approx. 10 days later

 

Special circumstances when the Panorama test cannot be used:

  • If the risk calculation by combined nuchal scan and double test has shown a risk greater than 1:10
  • If one or both parents are known carriers of a chromosomal abnormality

 

Panorama Basic

  • Screening for Down’s syndrome (trisomy 21), Trisomy 18 & 13, Turner syndrome and Triploidy.
  • Price 4700 Danish kroner (including scan)

 

Panorama Extended

  • Screening for Down’s syndrome (trisomy 21), Trisomy 18 & 13, Turner syndrome and Triploidy.
  • Screening for DiGeorge syndrome
  • Price 5200 Danish kroner (including scan)

 

Panorama Extended Plus

  • Screening for Down’s syndrome (trisomy 21), Trisomy 18 & 13, Turner syndrome and Triploidy.
  • Screening for DiGeorge syndrome
  • Screening for 1p36 deletion syndrome
  • Screening for Angelman, Cri-du-chat and Prader-Willi syndrome
  • Price 5800 Danish kroner (including scan)

 

For booking and further counselling phone: 33337111

 

You can get more information about the Panorama test directly from the website:

http://www.panoramatest.com/panorama-test

 

The Panorama test is not covered by the private health insurance company “Danmark”

 

 

Panorama test – a non-invasive screening method which gives very few false positive results. A false positive result means getting a high-risk result from a test when there is actually no cause for concern.